Monday, 19 October 2015

Manitoba Clamps More Restrictions on Moose Hunting as Populations Continue to Decline.

Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship advises that effective immediately, moose hunting is closed to all hunters in Game Hunting Areas (GHAs) 29 and 29A, in the Turtle Mountain area.  This conservation closure is in addition to previous closures in and around west-central and eastern Manitoba. 
PinP  photo.
Signs notifying hunters of the closure are posted around the boundary of each GHA.  Moose hunting is now closed to all hunters in the following GHAs:
• 12 (Red Deer Lake area);
• 18, 18A, 18B, 18C (Duck Mountain area);
• 14, 14A (Swan-Pelican area);
• 13, 13A (Porcupine Mountain area);
• 26 (Nopiming Area); and
• 29, 29A (Turtle Mountain area);
In addition, GHA 19A east of Duck Mountain is closed to licensed hunters, but remains open to Indigenous and Métis harvesters.
The moose population in these areas has been declining (less than 50 percent of what it was in the past) and this step is necessary to help the population recover. The animals will be monitored closely and if the population increases to an acceptable level, hunting restrictions may be lifted.
The Manitoba government will continue to work with Indigenous, Métis and other stakeholders to address all factors contributing to moose population declines.

Meanwhile, wolf hunting season has been extended and bonuses are being offered to both hunters and trappers who catch wolves. This is an effort to relieve the pressure on moose populations.
For more information, contact Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship, Boissevain District Office, at 204-534-2028; or Brandon Regional Office at 204-726-6441; or visitwww.manitoba.ca/conservation/wildlife.
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1 comment:

John Fefchak said...

The fact that different hunting regulations presently apply to "who you are " (indigenous /Metis ) in my opinion, only jeopardizes the true and required conservation of animals. One standard of regulation for all should be established. The one exception would be for residents in the boundaries of the far north , who totally rely on harvesting animals for their sustainability and survival.