Friday, 15 February 2013

Starving Polar Bears (podcast)

living on earth
Polar Bears have long been the poster species for the problem of climate change. But a new paper in Conservation Letters argues that supplemental feeding may be necessary to prevent polar bear populations from going extinct. Polar bear expert Andrew Derocher from the University of Alberta joins Host Steve Curwood to discuss how we can save the largest bear on the planet. Details here.
OR; Listen to the podcast, here:

Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference

On February 19 - 22, 2013 the Alberta Prairie Conservation Forum and the Alberta Society of Professional Biologists will jointly host the 10thPrairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference (PCESC). Details here.

PLT photo (r.) Cape May Warbler. "Use of certain insecticides to control spruce budworms causes steep declines in Cape May Warbler numbers. Logging, especially in the western portion of the species' range, may eventually pose risks to the Warbler because of reduced availability of the mature forests needed to support spruce budworms." (Source - Cornell Lab of Ornithology)

Wednesday, 13 February 2013

Chalk River's Spent Reactor Rods to be Shipped Through Valley


Ottawa Citizen
'Expedited' approval being sought for shipment of highly radioactive material. Details here.

PLT: PSSST...Government of Canada...news flash....Nuclear is not "alternative" or "sustainable" energy! It is misguided, expensive and dangerous. Find another way!

Obama Climate Change Poll Finds Majority Supports 'Significant Steps' To Tackle Problem


Huffington Post
WASHINGTON -- A wide majority of Americans support President Barack Obama's call to take action on climate change, according to polling…Details here.

Saskatchewan Predicts 'Above-Normal' Spring Runoff

Manitoba Co-Operator
That's assuming about-average precipitation from here out. Details here. 

Six Unions: One Voice

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

This Wednesday, February 13, the six unions operating on the University of Manitoba campus will unite with one voice. Details here.

Manitoba's Sustainable Pastures


Perennial polycultures and Managed Intensive Rotational Grazing (MIRG)
By Lydia Carpenter - Manitoba Eco-Journal

Permanent Pasture stands can be maintained by use of perennial polycultures that imitate the diversity of natural ecosystems. A diverse grouping of plants consisting of grasses, forbs, and woody species can make up a perenni- al polyculture and be used as pasture for grazing animals (ruminants), including cattle, sheep and goats. Animals on a perennial polyculture can contribute to nutrient cycling and an increase in soil organic matter. Established, maintained and healthy perennial pastures have also been shown to have a large capacity for carbon sequestration.
On our farm in Western Manitoba, we have counted over 30 different species of both native and non-native perennials and biennial forages, including nitrogen-fixing legumes such as alfalfa, pea-vine and various species of clover. These plants populate our permanent pasture that maintains a flock of sheep, a herd of goats and seasonal pro- duction of pasture-raised poultry. 
PLT photo.

Beyond Covid 19. Are we risking yet another pandemic if we continue to embrace "assembly-line" livestock production into the future?

by Larry Powell No one would argue that Covid 19 demands our undivided attention. Surely,  defeating this "beast" has to be &...