Monday, 31 December 2018

Emissions impossible


Institute for Agriculture & Trade Policy
A confined animal feeding operation in the U.S.
Photo by the E.P.A.
How big meat and dairy are heating up the planet. Story here.

RELATED: "In Hogs We Trust - Part 1V - The health and environmental costs of an expanded hog industry in Manitoba, Canada."


Saturday, 29 December 2018

Fort St. John, B.C. earthquakes were caused by fracking: BC Oil and Gas Commission


CTV News
B.C's Oil & Gas Commission (OGC) has concluded that three earthquakes in the area around Fort. St. John at the end of November were caused by hydraulic fracturing (fracking) operations. Details here.
A fracking operation in New York State.
Photo by US Geological Survey.
Please also read my story from 2015:
Is the "Dubious Duo" of Fracking & Earthquakes More Common in Canada Than we Know? PinP Wonders.  
l.p.

Friday, 28 December 2018

Industrial farms in Britain receive millions in subsidies

The Guardian

The Guardian and Bureau of Investigative Journalism establish that intensive farms in the UK received nearly £70m in two years. Details here.

Dead pigs in a dumpster outside a Manitoba factory farm await 
removal to an unknown destination. A PinP photo.

Please read related:  "In Hogs We Trust - Part 11 
-  


Farm workers sicken as Trump slashes regulations meant to protect them.


New York Times
Ordinary people suffer because of Trump's deference to powerful interests.
RELATED: 
Manitoba Family Believes it was Poisoned by Crop Spray (like the one referred to in the Times story)
Watch video here from Sept. 2006..







Tuesday, 25 December 2018

Why I’m looking forward to my first vegan Christmas


The Guardian
I won’t be eating turkey this year because of meat’s environmental impact. More here.
A turkey farm in Missouri. Photo by Billy Hathorn.

Saturday, 22 December 2018

As Polar Bear Attacks Increase in a Warming Arctic, a Search for Solutions


Yale Environment 360
An almost ice-free Northwest Passage, Aug. 2016.
Photo by NASA.
With sea ice reduced, polar bears in the Arctic are spending more time on land, leading to increased attacks on people. Concerned Inuit communities want to increase hunting quotas, but researchers are testing new technologies they hope will reduce these often deadly confrontations. Details here.

Tuesday, 18 December 2018

Chickens freezing to death and boiled alive: failings in US slaughterhouses exposed

The Guardian.
Chickens slowly freezing to death, being boiled alive, drowned or suffocating under piles of other birds are among hundreds of shocking welfare incidents recorded at US slaughterhouses, according to previously unpublished reports. Story here.

An American broiler (meat) chicken house.
USDA photo by Joe Valbuena.

Sunday, 9 December 2018

Private research funders court controversy with billions in secretive investments


Science Magazine

Cruise ships often burn bunker fuel, the very kind warned about in this story.
A Wikimedia image.
A few years ago, scientists funded by the Wellcome Trust, one of the world's wealthiest private philanthropies, published sobering findings about the deadly effects of air pollution. In a long-term study of elderly residents of Hong Kong, China, those exposed to higher levels of smog—especially tiny particles of soot produced by burning fossil fuels—were more likely to die of cancer than people who breathed cleaner air. Details here.

RELATED: Please read my blog-story, 

Conscientious investments and the tar sands connection" 
l.p.




by Larry Powell

US and Russia ally with Saudi Arabia to water down climate pledge


The
Guardian
Move shocks delegates at UN conference as ministers fly in for final week of climate talks. More here

Saturday, 8 December 2018

DDT in Alaska meltwater poses cancer risk for people who eat lots of fish


Science Today -  University of Maine
Mt. Jarvis, Alaska. Photo by R. McGimsey, U.S. Geological Survey
Children in Alaska whose diet includes a lot of fish from rivers fed by the Eastern Alaska Mountain Range may have a long-term elevated risk for cancer because of insecticides -- including DDT -- in the meltwater. Story here.

Wednesday, 5 December 2018

Greenland ice sheet melt 'off the charts' compared with past four centuries


PHY ORG
An aerial shot of mountains in Greenland. 2006.
Photo by Túrelio.
Surface melting across Greenland's mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating, according to…
More here.

Monday, 3 December 2018

Modern slavery promotes overfishing






Adaptation, speciation and extinction in the Anthropocene


PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B
An Oxfam photo.
Humans have dramatically altered the planet over the course of a century, from the acidity of our oceans to the fragmentation of our landscapes and the temperature of our climate. More here.

Sunday, 2 December 2018

Snowpack declines may stunt tree growth and forests' ability to store carbon emissions


ScienceNews
Hoar frost coats trees of the boreal forest in Manitoba, Canada. 
A PinP photo.
Researchers conducting a 5-year-long study examining snow cover in a northern hardwood forest region found that projected changes in climate could lead to a 95 percent reduction of deep-insulating snowpack in forest areas across the northeastern United States by the end of the 21st century. The loss of snowpack would likely result in a steep reduction of forests' ability to store climate-changing carbon dioxide and filter pollutants from the air and water. Story here.

Friday, 30 November 2018

Researchers say Canada’s race to conserve marine biodiversity may backfire

Laurier
Canada’s race to meet biodiversity conservation targets could jeopardize the very goal it is trying to achieve. More here.
Aerial view of the Bunsby marine park. West coast of Vancouver Island. Bc.
Photo by Kiwican







A cautionary tale even the "Commander-in-Chief" should understand. (Video)

PLEASE SIGN!

Thursday, 29 November 2018

New Canadian research sheds light on how a disease deadly to certain animals, mostly in the wild, is spread. The answer seems to lie beneath their feet!

by Larry Powell
It's a terrible ailment called chronic wasting disease (CWD).
A moose in Riding Mountain National Park, Canada.
A PinP photo.
Canada's Food Inspection Agency describes it as "a progressive, fatal disease of the nervous system of cervids (deer, elk and moose)." It is blamed on a prion, or abnormal protein, which is also linked to mad cow disease in cattle, scrapie in sheep and CJD in humans. But CWD is the only disease in this group which spreads through the environment.

It's been common in North America for years and, to a lesser degree, south Korea. Here in Canada, it has long been ravaging free-roaming animals in Saskatchewan and Alberta. More recently, it has been detected on a farm which raises red deer in Quebec and even among domesticated reindeer in northern Europe.

Up 'til now, at least, some experts have considered CWD pretty much unstoppable.

But a new study by a team of four researchers at the University of Alberta may have made a breakthrough.

While it's not clearly understood, soil seems to play a role in the horizontal spread of the disease. When an infected animal dies (see photo, below), its carcass sheds the harmful prion into the environment through its feces, saliva and urine.  

CWD is "shed" from infected deer and released from their carcasses. 
It can then "bind" to certain parts of the soil, and spread to healthy animals. 
Photo by Judd Aiken, 2018.
Then, it spreads to other, healthy animals, possibly when they graze. But, just as soil contributes to the problem, so, too, may it hold the solution. The research has found that, in mice, certain components in earth's organic matter, known as humic acids, actually degrade the prion responsible and reduce its ability to spread.
Near Grasslands Nat'l. Park, Saskatchewan.
A PinP photo.
But a lot of work lies ahead. 

In an e-mail, the lead author of the study, Dr. Judd Aiken, tells Planet in Peril, finding out how they can apply this new finding in practical ways, is a goal they intend to pursue. 


However, "We are not at the point where we are suggesting (or advocating) the use (of the beneficial effects of humic acids) to combat the environmental reservoirs of CWD infectivity. We are currently trying to identify the components of humic acids that have this ability to degrade prions."

 -30-

Sunday, 25 November 2018

Climate correction: when scientists get it wrong


PHYS ORG 
A few weeks ago, AFP joined news outlets around the world in covering the release of a major academic paper, warning that our oceans were warming dramatically faster than previously thought. There was one problem. It was wrong. Read more here. 
Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) are small schooling fish
that can be found on both sides of the North Atlantic.
A NOAA photo.



Thursday, 22 November 2018

Climate-heating greenhouse gases at record levels, says UN


The Guardian/WM0
Carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide are far above pre-industrial levels. Details here.
Air travel is the fastest-growing source of emissions.

Wednesday, 21 November 2018

Palm Oil Was Supposed to Help Save the Planet. Instead It Unleashed a Catastrophe.


The New York Times
A decade ago, the U.S. mandated the use of vegetable oil in biofuels, leading to industrial-scale deforestation — and a huge spike in carbon emissions. Story here.
A palm oil concession in Sumatra. Photo by Hayd.

Tuesday, 20 November 2018

Newfoundland record oil spill shows risks of offshore drilling, regulatory board says

Killing Plants Is the Fastest Way to End the World


TRUTHOUT
A Manitoba corn crop ruined by a freak summer frost. A PinP photo.
A recently-published study has found that “climate change and human activity are dooming species at an unprecedented rate.” Story here.

Monday, 19 November 2018

The 'new abnormal' — California megafires explode with off-the-charts fury


The National Observer
California is on the burning edge of climate breakdown. Story here.

Sunday, 18 November 2018

Humanity Sleepwalks as Earth Burns.

-->
by Larry Powell

This is the Ashcroft Reserve fire in BC in 2017. That was the worst year ever for wildfires in that province - until this year!  Photo by Shawn Cahill.

As I write this, human bodies incinerated beyond recognition, are being pulled from the ruins of wildfires in California. More than a thousand people are either missing or confirmed dead, with property damage set to top several billions of dollars. Smoke from the fires has now enveloped San Francisco.


President Trump blames "poor forest management,"and, after first threatening to withhold it, finally grants emergency aid. His critics take him to task for his lack of empathy for the victims. After visiting the fire zones, he continues, disgracefully, to deny the role manmade climate change is surely playing here.

But what's worse, his absence of a heart (which has been evident for some time), or his actual policies which have shown him to be complicit in these horrible disasters? Those critics seem determined not to mention that, since "day-one," Trump and his administration have been busy reversing steps taken under President Obama to reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions, whether they come from power plants, the planes we fly, or the cars, trucks, quads, speedboats, lawnmowers or snowmobiles we drive. 


All of these emissions (but especially those from coal), are trapping the sun's rays, dangerously over-heating our planet, creating conditions favourable to all kinds of extreme events, droughts and wildfires among them. All the while, Trump has slashed regulations aimed at curbing the massive toxic pollution which coal creates, claiming he wants to get people back working again in this dirty and dangerous industry.


He has gutted his own Environmental Protection Agency by putting skunks like Scott Pruitt in charge. Trump, Pruitt and others have monumentally betrayed their civic duty, by crippling the very branch of government which is supposed to protect human, animal and plant life. Instead, they are greasing the wheels for more harmful oil and gas development in places like the once-pristine Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge.

Recently, Trump also rolled back federal rules aimed at reducing the escape of methane into the atmosphere. It's a  greenhouse gas which is way more potent than the most common one, carbon dioxide. Methane, a prime component of natural gas, has been leaking into the air in alarming amounts from unknown numbers of "fracking sites,"where natural gas is often produced around the world.

And last, but not least, Trump has thumbed his nose at the rest of the world by withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accord. Scores of countries have signed on, promising to keep "global heating" in some kind of check, so that planet Earth can continue to be a place where life forms like ours, can continue to exist and flourish.


So, exactly why are Trump's critics, who often appear more like impotent bunglers than responsible lawmakers, not holding his feet to the fire over things like this, far more than they are?


Sadly, I fear that they do not want to offend an uninformed, poorly-educated or, dare I say it, stupid public, who form much of Trump's base. As a result, this Polluter-in-Chief is given a pass for his misguided, reckless and even criminal behaviour. Polls show the majority of Americans still believe that the science around climate change is somehow not "settled"yet.  It is! Reams of scientific wisdom, accumulated for at least a generation, prove this!

Trump (who thinks climate change is a hoax), along with "pseudo-scientists," hired by the oil industry, now seem to have actually captured the hearts and minds of a largely "unconscious" public. This is a nation where enlightened, proven truth is somehow largely missing from the homes, churches. schools and boardrooms of an otherwise advanced civilization.

Numbness to scientific fact is no stranger to Canada, either.

As I watch TV here at home in Manitoba, I see (as does everyone else) endless streams of ads from the car companies. Perhaps as many as ten each hour,  carpet-bomb the viewer, day and night. Slick, beautiful cars and trucks, each better than the other, are available with rebates and low interest on each purchase. Children appear in some, lured with the promise of onboard "wi-fi," so they can watch their favourite movie while on yet another carefree trip with their families. 


Yet there's never a whisper of advice warning either those children or anyone else, that these very cars and trucks, most powered by fossil fuels, are major contributors to air pollution. Transportation is a major source of global warming emissions. Pollutants from vehicle exhaust have long been linked to adverse impacts on nearly every organ in the body. (Source, US Union of Concerned Scientists.)



Neither does it seem to matter that Canada was a proud signatory to the Paris Accord a scant few years ago, pledging to keep emissions low enough so the planet does not incinerate. But in our so-called western democracy, vehicle-makers are allowed to engage in such disgraceful behaviour with impunity. 



To give the Devil his due, at least in the 'States, the world's biggest oil company, Exxon, is being indicted for covering up decades-old evidence of the harm its product does to our planet. No such thing here. So the ads continue, unabated and unchallenged. 

What role are people of faith playing here?


Anecdotes told by survivors of the California wildfires on TV news offer disturbing insights into what a lot of people actually think and believe. One couple told a remarkable tale of escaping the flames by sliding down a huge cliff to safety. The woman gave thanks to God for saving their lives.



A man, who was almost blind, thanked the Lord for guiding him as he managed, by following a police car, to drive through the flames to safety. This is a common refrain among people who never bother to explain where God was when, in this case, as they were being "saved," hundreds of others were burning to death!



In Canada, a pastor who writes a regular column in a rural newspaper, without mentioning climate change, confidently informed his readers a couple of years ago, that "God loves storm victims." He was referring to a series of super-hurricanes which whipped the southern U.S., sending countless God-fearing Texans into the streets, with floodwaters up to their armpits. When I challenged him as to how such terrible events could possibly be an act of God's love, he assured me, well, God didn't really make the storms happen. He just let them happen! 

Now I understand completely.



After all, why should the faithful believe in science, when scripture, especially to Evangelicals on the religious right, promises them the rapture, the Second Coming and everlasting life? Or what purpose does it serve to cut back on fuel consumption when it is God who will have the last word anyway, including the option of either raining fire and brimstone down on his wicked flock (inflicting "Armageddon" or "end days"on all of them), or, indeed, saving us all by just refraining from doing so? 



In such scenarios, I would argue that religion does nothing but stand in the way of practical, useful solutions - and helps ensure runaway climate change will culminate in a worst-case scenario - where places on Earth become "hothouses" - in which even the healthiest among us, will perish. In other words, it will prove to be, as Karl Marx famously stated, "the opiate of the masses." 


This unwillingness or inability of people to grasp the reality of our climate crisis is, sadly, evident, not only south of the border but, in Canada, as well. 

Evidence of this is everywhere. Vehicles, both big and small, regardless of the weather, are left mindlessly parked and running while their owners run errands. Excuses are either weak or non-sensical. A semi-driver told me he would have turned his rig off had he been away from it longer. As it was, he left it idling while he did some banking across the street. And he looked at me as if I was crazy when I told him "Mother Earth will thank you if you turn it off, next time!"

Some years ago, I asked a Greyhound bus driver if he ever thought of climate change when he left his vehicle running during prolonged stopovers (as he was doing in this case). He looked at me blankly and replied, "Oh, do you mean that guy in England?" 

Each time I sit outside on my patio, I try to spot vehicles driving by with more than one occupant in each. Most everyone should know by now that, the more people each vehicle carries, the more fuel-efficient travel then becomes. Hence the wisdom behind the push for more public (bus, light rail and rapid) transit. Yet, to my dismay, the vast majority of vehicles I see, carry only one occupant - the driver.


This astonishingly low level of what I would call "eco-wisdom" is there to see pretty much everywhere I look.



It has been argued that we can't possibly tell the unvarnished truth to our children. It would simply upset them too much. Yet we seem alright (and rightly so), with teaching them as much as we can about the horrors of past wars as a cautionary tale, to ensure they "never happen again." 



                                                   -30-









Beyond Covid 19. Are we risking yet another pandemic if we continue to embrace "assembly-line" livestock production into the future?

by Larry Powell No one would argue that Covid 19 demands our undivided attention. Surely,  defeating this "beast" has to be &...