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Showing posts from March 22, 2014

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon Urges Water, Energy Security ‘For the Many & Not Just the Few’

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Following is THE Secretary-General's message for World Water Day March 22ND: A Manitoba lake. PLT photo. Water is at the core of sustainable development.  This year’s observance of World Water Day focuses on the links between water and energy.  Both are critical for eradicating poverty.  And they interact with each other in ways that can help — or hinder — our efforts to build stable societies and lives of dignity for all. Climate change driven in great part by the unsustainable use of energy will exacerbate water stress and scarcity in many regions.  Efforts to provide universal access to water and energy will be undermined if the current warming trend continues. The many strong links between water and energy demand coherent, integrated policies and innovative strategies.  Water must be used — and electricity must be generated and distributed — equitably and efficiently, so all users get a fair share. These are the goals of the ongoing work of UN-Water and of the

Crops in Valley of Peace, Belize, Destroyed by Herbicide Sprayed on Them

News5 About a million dollars in vegetables have been destroyed in the Valley of Peace area, Cayo District of Belize (Central America).  The community is the largest provider of vegetables to two districts, but the farmers have lost their crops due to crop-dusting.  Green Tropics, the controversial company which grazed land in the Laboring Creek Jaguar Corridor Wildlife Sanctuary in 2012, is looking like a repeat offender tonight because they are said to be responsible for the herbicide spraying.  News Five’s Isani Cayetano reports.

Sea Sick: A Thoughtful, Sobering Account of Climate Change and the Ocean, Live on Stage

Globe & Mail There’s a funny anecdote that occurs late into Alanna Mitchell’s Sea Sick , the solo show opening the Theatre Centre’s handsome new Queen West home in Toronto. It finds Mitchell in a submersible 3,000 feet under the sea, crammed into a compartment no wider than a bathtub, and suddenly having a desperate need to pee. Details here.